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Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-09-2008

<b>PM to inaugurate global conclave on nuclear disarmament</b><!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->New Delhi, June 09: Prime Minister Manmohan Singh will on Monday inaugurate here a two-day international conference on nuclear disarmament that will - without hindering wider use of nuclear energy - focus on insulating the world from the danger of the atomic bomb falling into the hands of terrorists.

.........

Sergio de Queiroz Duarte, High Representative for Disarmament Affairs at the UN, will deliver the keynote address at the opening session of the conclave.

Top strategic experts and diplomats like Jonathan Granoff, president Global Security Initiative, Douglas Roche, former head of the UN Disarmament Committee, George Perkovich of Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Ivan Safranchuk, a Russian expert, and Li Chang-he, vice-president, China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, will be among those participating in the event.

External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee and Mani Shankar Aiyar, Minister for Panchayati Raj and a former aide to Rajiv Gandhi, will also address the conclave. Vice-President Mohammad Hamid Ansari will deliver the valedictory address.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Why now?


Nuclear Thread - 3 - ramana - 06-09-2008

Maybe getting ready to sign the deal. Disarmament is a Left/liberal issue in India and having paid homage at the altar of disarmament he can procced to perform the national hijragiri and sing the deal. This is the slow roll to Cap and roll back that Clinton Admin was pursuing.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-10-2008

Deal in mind, PM says we don't have the luxury to limit energy options


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-10-2008

moralisic sounding white man cometh to defang non-white nations.....

<b>Rudd announces new N-body </b>


Sydney, June 9: Australia has set up a new body for nuclear disarmament, hoping to recruit “like-minded countries” to strengthen the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, the Prime Minister said on Monday. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd announced the Nuclear Nonproliferations and Disarmament Commission during a visit to Japan, after laying a wreath in Hiroshima, site of the world’s first nuclear bombing. “Hiroshima should cause the world community to resolve afresh that all humankind must exert their every effort for peace in this 21st century,” Mr Rudd said.

In a speech at a Kyoto university, Mr Rudd said the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty was under great pressure, with some countries developing nuclear weapons outside its framework and others like North Korea defying the international community and leaving the treaty altogether.

“There are two courses of action available to the community of nations: to allow the NPT to continue to fragment, or to exert every global effort to restore and defend the treaty,” Mr Rudd said. The 190-nation Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty was established in 1980 to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and technology and to further the goal of nuclear disarmament. Review conferences are held every five years to assess implementation of the treaty.



Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-10-2008

<!--QuoteBegin-k.ram+Jun 10 2008, 06:20 AM-->QUOTE(k.ram @ Jun 10 2008, 06:20 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->Deal in mind, PM says we don't have the luxury to limit energy options
[right][snapback]82605[/snapback][/right]
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Nah!! people are asking them to return bribe.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-10-2008

<b>It will be 'tragic for India' to forgo nuke deal: US</b><!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->Seeking quick implementation of the civil nuclear agreement, the US has said it would be "tragic" for India if it forgoes this opportunity for a strategic partnership with the US.

"...We believe it is essential to quickly implement the landmark civil nuclear agreement with the United States and bring India into the international nuclear non-proliferation mainstream," US Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Christopher Padilla said here on Monday.

"It would be tragic for India to forgo this opportunity for a strategic partnership with the United States," he said.

Washington has been insisting that India needs to complete the processes required for the deal, saying time was running out in the light of the Presidential elections later this year.
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Media is creating environment for Moron Singh to ditch India's interest.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-11-2008

India-U.S. Civil Nuclear Accord Facing Difficulties

<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->June 11 (Bloomberg) -- The India-U.S. civilian nuclear deal has run into difficulties, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said, increasing the risk of the agreement failing as George W. Bush's presidency enters its final months.

``Our domestic politics has prevented us from going ahead,'' Singh told civil servant probationers in New Delhi today. ``<b>I still continue to hope that we will make progress in the months that lie ahead</b>. It is very important for us to move forward to end this nuclear apartheid that the world has sought to impose on India.''
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->




Nuclear Thread - 3 - ramana - 06-11-2008

This all could be red herring stories before the UPA signs the deal. Dont be fooled. The INC -Left mtg is this week and all these stories could be plants to lull everyone into thinking its all over. And then whamo they sign the deal and call for elections with uncle pouring in funds thru Lichtenstien accounts to get them re-elected. And then there is the PRC option after Olympics. The best course is to hold the deal in abeyance till November elections are over in US.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-12-2008

Moron Singh is trying to fool everyone by mortgaging India's interest. Not sure even Unkle money can help them, Do they have money to spare?
Pelosi and others are trying twist India's arm to protect their own interest in China.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-12-2008

the argument that "eek! oh my god , sign it now , we'll never get a better deal !".
is definitely scare mongering . A number of business interests want to see India on board and they'll keep pushing for engagement. so this is definitely not the last time when we will be offered a deal.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-12-2008

<!--QuoteBegin-ramana+Jun 11 2008, 09:35 PM-->QUOTE(ramana @ Jun 11 2008, 09:35 PM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->This all could be red herring stories before the UPA signs the deal. Dont be fooled. The INC -Left mtg is this week and all these stories could be plants to lull everyone into thinking its all over. And then whamo they sign the deal and call for elections with uncle pouring in funds thru Lichtenstien accounts to get them re-elected. And then there is the PRC option after Olympics. The best course is to hold the deal in abeyance till November elections are over in US.
[right][snapback]82701[/snapback][/right]
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Ramana, what is the PRC option? Didn;t quite follow ...



Nuclear Thread - 3 - Guest - 06-12-2008

US consul general optimistic about India-US nuclear deal

<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->Mumbai, June 12 (IANS) Michael S. Owen, the US consul general in India, believes the India-US nuclear deal will soon be sealed since the Bush administration is committed to the agreement and the government that would be elected later this year is also likely to want it to be successful.

Although Owen is sure the deal will be sealed, he anticipates delays. 'There could be delays because of the US presidential elections in November and the general elections in India early next year. The new administrations would need some time to settle down before prioritising the India-US nuclear deal,' the consul general said Wednesday.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->


Nuclear Thread - 3 - ramana - 06-12-2008

<!--QuoteBegin-k.ram+Jun 12 2008, 10:23 AM-->QUOTE(k.ram @ Jun 12 2008, 10:23 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin--><!--QuoteBegin-ramana+Jun 11 2008, 09:35 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(ramana @ Jun 11 2008, 09:35 PM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->This all could be red herring stories before the UPA signs the deal. Dont be fooled. The INC -Left mtg is this week and all these stories could be plants to lull everyone into thinking its all over. And then whamo they sign the deal and call for elections with uncle pouring in funds thru Lichtenstien accounts to get them re-elected. And then there is the PRC option after Olympics. The best course is to hold the deal in abeyance till November elections are over in US.
[right][snapback]82701[/snapback][/right]
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Ramana, what is the PRC option? Didn;t quite follow ...
[right][snapback]82735[/snapback][/right]
<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->


Repeat 1962 off course.


Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

US wants India to make 'tough choices' on n-deal, hasten economic reforms

Sat, Jun 14 09:18 PM

Washington, June 14 (IANS) The US wants India to go for some 'tough choices' in making the civil nuclear deal between the two countries a possibility and move faster on the path of economic openness.

'President (George) Bush pressed for the civilian nuclear agreement with India against strong opposition because he's committed to our long-term strategic partnership. Now India needs to make some tough choices,' said Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez.

Noting that rising demand for energy is 'an issue that our countries can't ignore', he hoped that India will quickly move forward to fully realise the potential of this historic agreement.

'We believe it's essential to quickly implement the landmark civilian nuclear agreement and bring India into the international nuclear non-proliferation mainstream,' he said at the India-US Global Partnership Summit, organised by the US-India Business Council.

The US remains committed to being India's partner in providing clean, sustainable energy. While this includes nuclear power, it also means using other clean energy technologies, he added.

Commerce Minister Kamal Nath had earlier told the summit that the nuclear deal has not been shelved.

'We are moving toward a political consensus inch by inch. I don't think it has been put away and I am confident that at some point we are going to arrive at this political consensus within India and that's the best way to do it,' he said.

Maintaining that 'openness' is necessary for economies and people to prosper, Gutierrez suggested that despite a healthy growth rate the pace of reforms in India appears to have 'slowed'.

'Since 1991, when then finance minister Manmohan Singh began sweeping reforms, India has enjoyed remarkable growth of about 8.5 percent annually. That's more than double the growth rate from India's independence until then.

'The message is clear: the faster India opens, the faster India grows. However, we are concerned that the pace of reform appears to have slowed,' Gutierrez said.

'We believe improvements in market access, easing of investment restrictions, tariffs reductions, and the elimination of barriers in food trade should continue because it is good for India.

'India, like the US, must decide if it will continue the openness that has brought so much prosperity, or risk sliding backward,' he said.

Gutierrez also announced the setting up of the Department of Commerce's India Business Centre, which will provide American companies business counselling and market intelligence that's critical to successfully doing business in India.

'The US and India are two great democracies. And we know that our systems require compromise for the greater good. Sometimes our leaders have to make tough choices that are in our long-term national interests,' he said.




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

'India-US nuke deal should've been criteria-based'

Sat, Jun 14 02:02 PM

Washington, June 14 (IANS) The India-US civilian nuclear deal should have been criteria-based instead of being country-specific and a pact on these lines should now be offered to Pakistan, a leading American strategic expert says.

In testimony before the Senate Homeland Security Subcommittee, Stephen Cohen, a leading South Asia expert, said the US should offer Pakistan a nuclear deal to make Islamabad accept the obligations that come with being a nuclear weapons state.

Criteria-based deals 'could have been offered to states like Pakistan and Israel, countries that have not signed the non-proliferation treaty but have nuclear weapons', Cohen said Friday.

Soon after the US declared its intention in July 2005 to offer a nuclear deal to India, Pakistan urged Washington not to make it India-specific to permit other countries to also benefit from this arrangement.

The Bush administration, however, made it clear it was making only a one-time exception for India and had no intention of offering a similar deal to Pakistan.

Cohen told the Senate panel that the US could offer a deal to Pakistan patterned on the European Union's offer to Turkey that requires Ankara to meet certain criteria for joining the EU.

'In the case of Pakistan you can establish criteria, such as a safe and secure nuclear programme, commitment to nuclear non-proliferation and arms control,' he said. 'These are same as the NPT obligations.'

If Pakistan accepts these obligations, 'it would be certainly eligible' for a nuclear deal with the US.

Cohen noted that China was already helping Pakistan with its nuclear programme but this did not 'quite legitimise' it.

As part of the legitimisation process, Pakistan would have to accept the obligations of the NPT signatories and will have to share all of its knowledge about past proliferation activities, Cohen added.

Lisa Curtis, another South Asia expert at Washington's Heritage Foundation, recalled that when the US cut off assistance to Pakistan in the early 1990s, there was debate within Islamabad's security establishment on protecting its interests without Washington's backing.

'Subsequently Pakistan began engaging in risky activities such as proliferating nuclear technology and know-how to North Korea in exchange for missiles it deemed necessary to meet the threat from India,' she said, urging Washington to stay engaged with Islamabad.




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

Leave India to take a decision on nuke deal: Kissinger

Fri, Jun 13 07:57 PM

Washington, June 13 (PTI) The former American Secretary of State Henry Kissinger says the US should leave India to make its own decision on the stalled Indo-US nuclear deal and then "live with it" whatever be the outcome. Noting that the US has said all it has to say on the deal, Kissinger also felt that Indo-US ties transcended the nuke pact that remained stuck due to domestic politics in India stemming out of strong Left objections.

US officials have been nudging India in the recent months to move forward on the deal highlighting how it stood to gain a lot once the pact is clinched. "I have been involved in encouraging India towards the nuclear deal.

It is now an Indian problem. It (India) doesn't need any lectures.

It understands the imperatives of each decision," Kissinger said durring the 33rd anniversary celebrations of the US-India Business Council. "When the decision is made we will welcome it and live with it.

Our relationship will be strong no matter what the decision," the former top official in the Nixon and Ford administrations said. Addressing the Council, India's Ambassador to the US Ronen Sen said "the building blocks for the civilian nuclear cooperation are in place.

I sincerely hope that we take this to the logical conclusion." PTI.




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

US voices support for n-deal, points to ticking clock

Thu, Jun 12 09:13 AM

Washington, June 12 (IANS) The United States has reiterated its firm support for the stalled India-US civil nuclear deal while reminding New Delhi of the 'bottom line' of the need to get US congressional approval before it gets into election mode.

'Well, I think that this administration has been firm in its support for this deal. It continues to be so,' State Department Deputy Spokesman Gonzalo Gallegos said Wednesday when asked to comment on a British newspaper report that the deal is close to dead.

'Right now we're at a situation where this is with the Indian government and literally with the Indian people,' he said alluding to the Indian coalition' s leftist supporters' opposition that has stalled the deal for over ten months.

'This is a matter for them to decide and then follow through with,' Gallegos said. 'We've consistently stated that we stand behind this, that we continue to support it, and that we would like to move apace in terms of proceeding with it.'

'I think, however, the bottom line is the reality of the congressional calendar that has to be dealt with,' he said. 'We do hope that we can continue and possibly concludes this in near future.'

US officials have time and again reminded New Delhi that it would be difficult to get Congressional approval for the implementing 123 agreement finalised last July in an election year unless it comes up before the legislature before end June.

India needs to sign an India specific safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and get the approval of 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) before the US Congress can give its go-ahead.

Asked if there was any hope of the deal being completed before President George Bush leaves office in January, the spokesman declined to commit to any dates. 'I would be the last one - if my boss and my boss's boss are loath to commit to dates, I fear it even more than they do,' he said.

The Financial Times had cited a former Bush administration official as suggesting that the India-US nuclear deal is almost certainly dead because of delays by New Delhi.

Asked whether it was now impossible to push the deal through in the dying days of Bush's term, a senior Bush administration official told the daily: 'That is probably correct.'

'Even if the Indian government were suddenly to turn around and get the IAEA stage completed, there would be no time for the remaining two stages,' said Ashley Tellis, one of the original architects of the deal and now an adviser to Republican Party presidential candidate John McCain.




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

India-US nuclear deal 'nearly dead', Obama 'highly ambivalent'

Wed, Jun 11 07:13 PM

London, June 11 (IANS) The proposed India-US nuclear deal is almost certainly dead because of delays by New Delhi, as Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama remains 'highly ambivalent' about it, a British newspaper Wednesday reported.

Asked whether it was now impossible to push the deal through in the dying days of President George Bush's term, a senior Bush administration official told the Financial Times: 'That is probably correct.'

The paper quoted an adviser to Obama as saying the Democratic Party presidential candidate was 'highly ambivalent' about the deal. Obama submitted a wrecking amendment to the original bill in 2006.

The paper said the Bush administration has 'watched with growing frustration' as New Delhi repeatedly missed deadlines to complete the deal.

It said US officials had hoped until recently Prime Minister Manmohan Singh would persuade his colleagues, including Congress president Sonia Gandhi, to face down his government's Left allies over the deal.

But it said New Delhi has 'sat on the deal' for the past 10 months without inviting inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to begin their safeguard inspections in India.

Approval of the IAEA and the 45-nation Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) is needed before the US Congress can give its go-ahead.

'Even if the Indian government were suddenly to turn around and get the IAEA stage completed, there would be no time for the remaining two stages,' said Ashley Tellis, one of the original architects of the deal and now an adviser to Republican Party presidential candidate John McCain.

The paper quoted senior Indian officials as saying privately that their best chances of reviving the deal would come if McCain, who supports the deal, were to become US president.

The collapse of the deal would jeopardise India's access to sensitive US technology which could have an impact on defence sales and civil nuclear development.

'If you look at the regime between 1974 [when India conducted its first nuclear test] and 1998 [its second] that would give you some idea of what India would be heading back towards,' Tellis said, adding: 'This would be an historic blunder.'




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

Will Democrat Obama back Indo-US nuke deal?

Mon, Jun 9 10:32 AM

Will Democrat Barack Obama, who once proposed a "killer" amendment to a legislation on Indo-US civil nuclear deal placing limits on the amount of atomic fuel to be sold to India, back the landmark agreement if he wins the White House race? While a clear-cut answer is not available, the 46-year-old Illonis Senator who overcame an intense electoral battle against his rival Hillary Clinton in the Democratic Presidential nomination race, had reluctantly backed the legislation on the deal worked out by the Republican administration of President George W Bush.

Though the African-American senator co-sponsored the "killer legislation", it was eventually rejected.

The Clinton campaign had been more vocal on the issue saying that she was voted in its favour and was not "lukewarm" in her response as Democrats are perceived on the issue.

"She looked into the issue.... She decided to vote in favour of the nuclear deal and was a supporter of it," Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe said.

However, the strongest backing for the stalled deal has come from Obama's Republican rival John McCain who said the nuclear agreement will strengthen ties with the world's biggest democracy and involve India in the fight against nuclear proliferation.

With Clinton now having formally bowed out of the race and backing to him, Obama wants to define the faltering economy as the paramount issue facing the country.




Nuclear Thread - 3 - acharya - 06-15-2008

Mulford bats for atomic energy, cites n-deal with Russia

Thu, Jun 5 10:21 PM

New Delhi, Jun 5 (PTI) Dropping enough hints to cajole India on the path to atomic deal, US Ambassador David Mulford today said the world was on the verge of nuclear rennaissance as the area had "huge potential". Pitching for the "clean, efficient, safe energy which is very competitively priced", he said countries were entering into bilateral agreements and cited the recent US-Russia pact as an example.

"Well, I think we do," Mulford said when asked whether he saw a nuclear rennaissance taking place in the near future. Pointing out that China and Russia are making rapid strides in the atomic field, he told reporters here that the nuclear energy sector has "huge potential" at the moment.

"The US recently reached a 123 agreement with Russia to come together and work together in civil nuclear area," he said. India and the US also have concluded 123 agreement but it is yet to be signed because of stiff resistance from the Left allies of the UPA government.

The US envoy, who played a key role in negotiating the Indo-US civil nuclear deal, said a spurt has been witnessed in applications to Washington for licenses to build new nuclear reactors and upgrade the existing ones. "After many years of no new reactors there is a considerable interest in new licenses in the past couple of years," he said.

Mulford said the renewed interest in nuclear power was a result of good experience the Americans had over the last 30 years with "clean, efficient, safe energy which is very competitively priced." PTI.