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What DNA Says About Aryan Invasion Theory -2
#1
Previous thread link

PART -1
LINK TO PART -1
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#2
Aryans invaders are depicted as blonde whit blue eyes .But were this type of fizionomy apear so?
Some say that apear first in Scandinavia during the ice age.This conclusion may be related whit the fact that most of blonde people are there.
However Scandinavia was UNDER the ice cap during the ice age, and the ice age climate of central asia or Himalaya was just as good if not better for development of such features.
The gene of blondess is recesive and some say that natural blonde hair will disapierd in the next 300 years.
Are historical evidence that in Syria,Iran or other tropical countries was having a much big number of blonde haired people then today.Then blonde hair starting to disapier along whit the climate warming.This is a relative slow process that take a couple of thouands of years.
May be wasnt uncomon to see blonde people in India in 5000 BC.
  Reply
#3
rkumar/romani/....
There was no Aryan invader. In Sanskrit "Arya" is used to give respect.
There is NO ARYAN race. Hitler is dead and so his theory.
So don't bring same crap again and again..............
  Reply
#4
<!--QuoteBegin-Mudy+Aug 21 2006, 04:59 AM-->QUOTE(Mudy @ Aug 21 2006, 04:59 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->rkumar/romani/....
There was no Aryan invader. In Sanskrit "Arya" is used to give respect.
There is NO ARYAN race. Hitler is dead and so his theory.
So don't bring same crap again and again..............
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True ,Exactly thats i also say it .Is no such thing as aryan invader.
In my theory, the blonde hair has nothing to do whit un-prooven IE invaders.At the contrary, i say that is posible to blond hair to develop in central asia or even India in the most naturaly way during the ice age.
I mention this because so many are confuse about mentions of blonde hair in early assirian,iranian or indian documents. They are induce in error by the fact that most bonde people today are scandinavian type so they must think that thoose blonde guys mentioned must be also scandinavians.
Even more ,they try to proove that word for blonde is infact open brown.

I hope that i explaind better this time.
Sorry, the art of speech is not exactly the thing in which i excell.
We must renunce to theory spread by AIT that blonde hair gene apear in Europe .
May be Husky can add someting.
  Reply
#5
I my self was puzzeled about why early romanians(2000years ago) was depicted whit yellow and red hair while today most of population have brown hair. When i find out that yellow hair gene is in fact a recesive gene i realised what realy happend. The yellow gene was find on a much large world scale then today.The AIT proponents forgot to mention that. They make up the idea that yellow hair can be only germanic and the sarmatians,medes,persians whit blonde hair ,or that brahman whit red hair are in fact germaic aryans .
Even more, they pretend that blonde gene apear during the ice age because blonde womens was considered more atractive then womens whit brown hair.So it was a natural selection. <!--emo&:lol:--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='laugh.gif' /><!--endemo-->
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#6
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->brahman whit red hair are in fact germaic aryans .
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
rkumar/romani,
Have you seen or met any Brahman?
  Reply
#7
<!--QuoteBegin-Mudy+Aug 21 2006, 07:28 AM-->QUOTE(Mudy @ Aug 21 2006, 07:28 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin--><!--QuoteBegin--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->brahman whit red hair are in fact germaic aryans .
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
rkumar/romani,
Have you seen or met any Brahman?
[right][snapback]55947[/snapback][/right]
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If I have understood rkumar/romany correctly (and I admit it is a bit difficult) he attributes the remarks about 'red haired' brahmins to the proponents of AIT.

Or does he?
  Reply
#8
<!--QuoteBegin-Mudy+Aug 21 2006, 07:28 AM-->QUOTE(Mudy @ Aug 21 2006, 07:28 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin--><!--QuoteBegin--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->brahman whit red hair are in fact germaic aryans .
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
rkumar/romani,
Have you seen or met any Brahman?
[right][snapback]55947[/snapback][/right]
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Brahman have no form ,how can be seen?
If you refer to function call Brahman ,yes ,i have even a friend ,Brahman, from Himachal.
Are mentions in documents about Brahmans whit red hair.
I talk about white and some understend black.
I talk about sugar and some understend salt.

Seem you stil belive that im talking about AIT.
10000 bc -blonde gene existing in over 30-50% of population of Iran,India,Middle East,Central Asia,Spain,Ukraine etc.North of Europe the so call birth place of blonde gene was under the ice cap <!--emo&:eager--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/lmaosmiley.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='lmaosmiley.gif' /><!--endemo--> ;
4000Bc- blonde gene restricted at Central Asia,Europe,and sporadic(small groups)
in Middle east,India,Iran
1900 AD-blonde gene in north of Europe ,and sporadic in south Europe.
2300 AD -blonde gene sporadic in Finnland ,while totaly disapierd in all world.

The pro-AIT guys peak the situation existent in 1900AD and use it in their favour(because some groups fom Asia like sarmatians or tocharians have indeed yellow or red hair),while totaly ignoring the situation from 10000 BC and 4000BC.Also they made up the concept that dravidians are in fact africans(and north indian non-africans) base also on some superficial similarites like skin color and of course base on a huge ignorance.

Their succes was so big that even indians cant belive that India and Central Asia can be the place of birth for the yellow hair gene .
  Reply
#9
Post 268:<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->Aryans invaders are depicted as blonde whit blue eyes .But were this type of fizionomy apear so? Some say that apear first in Scandinavia during the ice age.This conclusion may be related whit the fact that most of blonde people are there.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->Your first statement answers your question. Aryans are <i>depicted</i> as having certain features. No evidence for any Aryans, let alone for any of their invasions. Europeans made them up and then imagined they must look European - particularly northern European.

Post 270:<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->We must renunce to theory spread by AIT that blonde hair gene apear in Europe .<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->Why? Is there evidence to denounce the theory? I'm not even sure I comprehend all of the original theory - where in Europe are the genes for fair hair thought to have arisen?

I have no idea where blonde hair 'originated' or even whether it had one point of origin. The Australian Aboriginals (who migrated to Australia 60,000 to 40,000 bce) have frequent occurrences of blonde hair. Did they give rise to the blonde hair phenotype in Europe? Yes, no, maybe?
I suspect that there are multiple origins. And <i>I think</i> that maybe the central or northern parts of Eastern-Europe or Russia could be the origin for <i>European</i> fair hair.

Red hair is mentioned amongst Japanese - some Samurai were described as being 'red-headed'. I don't know if this was meant symbolically (to designate particular heroic or villainous characters) or meant literally or whether the Japanese found brown hair so strange that they described it as red. This might be like how the Greeks described Alexander as having fair hair and then looking at the famous painting of him, his hair colour is medium-brown. So this is then light enough to be considered 'fair hair' in ancient Greece.
And as a curious aside, I know a South Korean girl with only Korean ancestry who has very light brown hair.

There are some dark-brown haired people in India, and a smaller proportion in the North with dark reddish-brown hair (like if one puts Mehendi also called Henna in one's hair). That's normal and part of a continuum from black to dark brown to possibly reddish in the very cold climate of Kashmir.
In South India, a very few people have dark brown hair, for instance Aishwarya Rai's real hair colour is a dark brown (not seen in her films now).

A few Kashmiri Khans and Pakistani Punjabis have (bright) red hair. Perhaps this has to do with some Turkic, Iranian or even Arabian or other ancestry (see below).

Post 271:<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->The yellow gene was find on a much large world scale then today.The AIT proponents forgot to mention that. They make up the idea that yellow hair can be only germanic and the sarmatians,medes,persians whit blonde hair ,or that brahman whit red hair are in fact germaic aryans .<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->I don't know whether light hair is actually indigenous to Afghans and Persians. Before Islam, some southern Russians were Zoroastrians: they were ethnically Slavic, and religiously Zoroastrian and were affiliated nationally with the edges of the extended Persian Empire.

After Islam, slaves from unconverted countries were transported all over the 'Islamic World'. There were many slaves from Eastern-Europe, Greece and Russia - and even greater numbers from India, Persia and Africa - who were kidnapped by and sold into the then expanding Muslim world.
When Persia and Afghanistan were converted to Islam, they too started bringing large numbers of people over from the bordering European countries to serve as slaves. The women went into the Arabian, Turkish, Egyptian, Iranian and Afghan harems (because their European features were much prized) and the men went into their armies. Male slaves of most countries were often castrated, though the frequency of the occurrence varied depending on country of origin and was in fact based on racism.
Mamaluks literally means "White slaves". Many children born of the women of the harem would of course have inherited genetic material from their maternal side too. I think that more than anything explains why there are particular regions in these now-Muslim countries where there are light-brown, red and even blonde-haired people.

If you look at pictures of the people of Iran who've traditionally remained Zoroastrians until today, they still have very dark hair and look more like the people of the Indian subcontinent than other Iranians do.
Recent Iranian re-converts to Zoroastrianism could well have different hair colours, though.

One more thing, I've always wondered why people point to light eye-colours in India and say that that's proof of an Aryan invasion or at least of some connection with the European 'Caucasian' gene pool. I don't know that it proves anything of the sort.
I've seen 2 stray cats and several stray dogs in India that have green, grey and even blue eyes. Did they come to India by way of an Aryan Invasion too? Are they Caucasian cats and dogs originally from Europe or central Asia? Do the indologists' rules for AIT apply only to humans or are such phenomena among animals taken into account too?

Post 271:<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->Even more, they pretend that blonde gene apear during the ice age because blonde womens was considered more atractive then womens whit brown hair.So it was a natural selection.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->I think that hair colour is a phenomenon that might have to do with climate and region. Or perhaps it's no different from fur colours. Or perhaps it's a combination of several factors that have caused the development of various hair colours, including but not necessarily limited to climate (geography) and something similar to the principles determining fur colour.
I have no idea, never studied this. <b>But here's an interesting National Geographic article I found (check out the CG picture on the page too):</b>
Photo in the News: Mammoths Came in Blond, Brunette?
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->July 6, 2006—The same gene that gives redheads their fiery locks gave woolly mammoths either light or dark coats, scientists say.

Researchers made the discovery after sequencing a gene found in ancient DNA taken from the leg bone of a frozen Siberian mammoth.

The gene is known to help determine hair color in many mammals, from humans to mice. (Two Florida beach mice with light and dark fur are pictured here atop reconstructions of mammoths.)

The study marks the first time researchers have mapped a complete gene from the nuclear DNA of an extinct animal. It also explains the different shades found in preserved mammoth hair.

<i>"Nobody knew if the hair changed its color over time lying in the soil, or whether there is a genetic basis for these color differences,"</i> said Michael Hofreiter, an evolutionary biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.
His research <i>suggests</i> the latter, although scientists still don't know which color hair the Ice Age beasts grew, only that it came in light and dark shades. <!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->If I had the chance, I'd have liked to ask <b>indologists</b> the following:
Does the above count as evidence that these Mammoths (who it seems might possibly have come in blonde and brunette besides the generally known black fur) are Indo-European/Aryan? Did they come from the Aryan Urheimat too - where the purported Aryan people are thought to have existed in blonde-, brunette- and black-haired varieties? It's a shame that it doesn't look like these animals spoke any languages... else we might finally have proof for PIE. (Whether the mammoths telepathically communicated in PIE can't be determined, I think <!--emo&Wink--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='wink.gif' /><!--endemo--> ).
If the mammoths need not have originated in the Urheimat, why should I believe all 'European' features originated in the Urheimat (wherever that is)? <!--emo&:blink:--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blink.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='blink.gif' /><!--endemo-->


Mudy Post 272:<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->rkumar/romani,
Have you seen or met any Brahman?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->I was going to ask exactly the same thing. The greater mystery is how so many indologists - who've probably never even come to India, or at least had a proper look around - imagine that traditional brahmin communities have more 'European' features.

It is said Saraswat Brahmins sometimes have brown hair and occasionally have light eyes. But that would be reasonable in their case, because they originally came from the Punjab region, and then travelled to Kashmir and settled in other parts, as well as coming down to Gomantak in more recent times. So far up north in India it is much colder and they lived there for a very long time (furry mammoths' hair might turn from black to brown there too if they stayed there long enough).


Romani,
The only blonde-haired person in India I've ever seen is a son of an old actor called Shashi Kapoor. The son looks Australian in the pictures I've come across. But that is because his mother (Shashi Kapoor's wife) is British.
There may be others with fair hair in India today, but I suspect that this could be because there were women who were assaulted by the British (see the page on European Imperialism at www.atributetohinduism.com). Such sad events could have resulted in children and they might have had descendants who have passed on these recently-introduced European genes.

No Tamil Brahmana, nor Tamil brahmin community member I've seen has ever had light hair, let alone a hair colour that could really be called brown (and I've been to many, many weddings in Chennai). That might be because I come from Tamil Nadu and all the traditionally brahmin communities there are practically entirely indigenous to the region and look the same on average as all the other Hindus there, and have about the same level of variation.
But Mudy appears to be from a northern part of India and if she can't confirm your expectations of blonde- or red-haired brahmanas, then I think it's worthwhile to stop assuming it.
  Reply
#10
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->blonde- or red-haired brahmanas<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Not a one case.
Red hair can be found in Multan area (Pakistan). Again result of assault on women by invading force. Harem culture was very popular in that part of world.
Blonde hair can be seen on very very poor kids, because of mal-nutrition.
Other ways to make lighter hair is put lot of lemon/lime juice on hair and sit under sun.
  Reply
#11
<!--QuoteBegin-rkumar+Aug 21 2006, 04:34 AM-->QUOTE(rkumar @ Aug 21 2006, 04:34 AM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->Aryans invaders are depicted as blonde whit blue eyes .But were this type of fizionomy apear so?
Some say that apear first in Scandinavia during the ice age.This conclusion may be related whit the fact that most of blonde people are there.
However Scandinavia was UNDER the ice cap during the ice age, and the ice age climate of central asia or Himalaya was just as good if not better for development of such features.
The gene of blondess is recesive and some say that natural blonde hair will disapierd in the next 300 years.
Are historical evidence that in Syria,Iran or other tropical countries was having  a much big number of blonde haired people then today.Then blonde hair starting to disapier along whit the climate warming.This is a relative slow process that  take a couple of thouands of years.
May be wasnt uncomon to see blonde people in India in 5000 BC.
[right][snapback]55940[/snapback][/right]
<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Rkumar,
You are over analyzing. Blonde categorization happened because people who invented AIT: i.e Max Mueller and others created the myth that Aryans were blonde based on what Germans of Mueller's time look like.

There was never an invasion.

And remember phenotype, i.e visible characteristics of genes is not scientific to figure out the underlying genetics. So discussing hair color, length of nose, color of eyes etc. is futile.

Lastly if you are interested look up the Mittani people. There seals have been dated to later half of second millenium BC.

-Digvijay
  Reply
#12
Genetics guroos..

What does this figure mean ?

<img src='http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/94/Cavallisforzageneclusters.jpg' border='0' alt='user posted image' />

  Reply
#13
<!--QuoteBegin-rajesh_g+Sep 13 2006, 05:57 PM-->QUOTE(rajesh_g @ Sep 13 2006, 05:57 PM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->What does this figure mean ?
[right][snapback]57299[/snapback][/right]
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Looks like join-the-dots puzzle gone wrong...as there used to be like this one in the kids magazines I used to read in childhood...champak...nandan... <!--emo&:blow--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blow.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='blow.gif' /><!--endemo--> <!--emo&Big Grin--><img src='style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif' border='0' style='vertical-align:middle' alt='biggrin.gif' /><!--endemo-->
  Reply
#14
Has anyone read this book? Any reviews?
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->From Amazon.com

<b>Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors</b> (Hardcover)
by Nicholas Wade (Author)
Hardcover: 320 pages
Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The (April 20, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN: 1594200793

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly
Scientists are using DNA analysis to understand our prehistory: the
evolution of humans; their relation to the Neanderthals, who populated
Europe and the Near East; and Homo erectus, who roamed the steppes of
Asia. Most importantly, geneticists can trace the movements of a
little band of human ancestors, numbering perhaps no more than 150,
who crossed the Red Sea from east Africa about 50,000 years ago.
Within a few thousand years, their descendents, Homo sapiens, became
masters of all they surveyed, the other humanoid species having become
extinct. According to New York Times science reporter Wade, this DNA
analysis shows that evolution isn't restricted to the distant past:
Iceland has been settled for only 1,000 years, but the inhabitants
have already developed distinctive genetic traits. Wade expands his
survey to cover the development of language and the domestication of
man's best friend. And while "race" is often a dirty word in science,
one of the book's best chapters shows how racial differences can be
marked genetically and why this is important, not least for the
treatment of diseases. This is highly recommended for readers
interested in how DNA analysis is rewriting the history of mankind.
Maps. (Apr. 24)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier
Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist
Genetics has been intruding on human origins research, long the domain
of archaeology and paleoanthropology. Veteran science journalist Wade
applies the insights of genetics to every intriguing question about
the appearance and global dispersal of our species. The result is
Wade's recounting of "a new narrative," which also has elements of a
turf war between geneticists and their established colleagues. He
efficiently explains how an evolutionary event (e.g., hairlessness) is
recorded in DNA, and how rates of mutation can set boundary dates for
it. For the story, Wade opens with a geneticist's estimate that modern
(distinct from "archaic") Homo sapiens arose in northeast Africa
59,000 years ago, with a tiny population of only a few thousand, and
was homogenous in appearance and language. Tracking the ensuing
expansion and evolutionary pressures on humans, Wade covers the
genetic evidence bearing on Neanderthals, race, language, social
behaviors such as male-female pair bonding, and cultural practices
such as religion. Wade presents the science skillfully, with detail
and complexity and without compromising clarity. Gilbert Taylor
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved <!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
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#15
http://www.hinduismtoday.com/hpi/2006/9/19.shtml#5
New Download File For Catalog of Indus Seals Available

INDIA, September 17, 2006: In yesterday's HPI, we mentioned about this book:

Kalyanaraman, S., 2006, Bharatiya Languages -- History and formation of Jaati-bhasha -- Sarasvati hieroglyphs as mlecchita vikalpa (Decipherment of Indus script), Bangalore, Babasaheb (Umakanta Keshav) Apte Smarak Samiti, 652 pp. It includes an up-to-date and comprehensive corpus of inscriptions of Sarasvati civilization (Indus Script) -- including finds of the year 2000 season, proto-elamite parallels, artifacts in museums and mss. of Schoyen collection.

There is a new link to a PDF version of the file which, at 60MB, is smaller and in one piece, here .

http://www.bigupload.com/d=D2E2DB7F
  Reply
#16
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->What does this figure mean ?<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
They have created two different groups within India. S.Dravidian and Indian.
I think they are trying to make Tamils as different genetic group clubbing them with Sri Lanka. It means they are still sticking with old colonial book, no new concept.
  Reply
#17
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin--><b>Phylogeny of Mitochondrial DNA Macrohaplogroup N in India, Based on Complete Sequencing: Implications for the Peopling of South Asia</b>

Malliya gounder Palanichamy, Chang Sun, Suraksha Agrawal, Hans-Jürgen Bandelt, Qing-Peng Kong, Faisal Khan, Cheng-Ye Wang, Tapas Kumar Chaudhuri, Venkatramana Palla, and Ya-Ping Zhang

The American Journal of Human Genetics, volume 75 (2004),

To resolve the phylogeny of the autochthonous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups of India and determine the relationship between the Indian and western Eurasian mtDNA pools more precisely, a diverse subset of 75 macrohaplogroup N lineages was chosen for complete sequencing from a collection of >800 control-region sequences sampled across India. We identified five new autochthonous haplogroups (R7, R8, R30, R31, and N5) and fully characterized the autochthonous haplogroups (R5, R6, N1d, U2a, U2b, and U2c) that were previously described only by first hypervariable segment (HVS-I) sequencing and coding-region restriction-fragmentndashlength polymorphism analysis. <b>Our findings demonstrate that the Indian mtDNA pool, even when restricted to macrohaplogroup N, harbors at least as many deepest-branching lineages as the western Eurasian mtDNA pool. </b>Moreover, the distribution of the earliest branches within haplogroups M, N, and R across Eurasia and Oceania provides additional evidence for a three-founder-mtDNA scenario and a single migration route out of Africa.<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->
  Reply
#18
<!--QuoteBegin-->QUOTE<!--QuoteEBegin-->http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2156/2/13/comments/comments
.............Recently, Palanichamy et al.(2004) disregarded our interpretation as simplistic and, based on new mitochondrial genome data of macrohaplogroup N in India, supported the more parsimonious hypothesis of a single migration route out of Africa proposed by others (Forster et al. 2001), but with the addition of another lineage, R, to that migration. So a scenario with a single migration route out of Africa and three-founder mtDNA lineages was defined. In a recent article(Tanaka et al. 2004) the weakness of both hypothesis to congruently incorporate new mitochondrial data, mainly from Australia and Papua New Guinea (Ingman and Gyllensten 2003), was discussed suggesting that a new work hypothesis should be formulated to accomodate this recent information. <b>Of main concern was the presence, in high frequencies, of macrohaplogroup N basal lineages in aboriginal Australians contrasting with its paucity in India and its absence in PNG. </b>If, as we proposed, N marks the northern route, how to explain its absence in southeast Asia and PNG, its natural path to Australia? On the other hand, if N was carried along with M in all routes how to explain its paucity in India and its absence in southeast Asia? Not to mention the lack of basal M in western Eurasia..............<!--QuoteEnd--><!--QuoteEEnd-->

still euros are trying to hold out N as their northern route marker, despite pre-nasreen's presence in malaysia and recent work demonstrating deep roots for N in india. M expansion distorted the original N picture.
  Reply
#19
Can somebody please explain in laymans terms what these papers mean ?

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/jour...2812/42812.html
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0507714103v1

I found these papers mentioned here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetics_and_...s_of_South_Asia
  Reply
#20
<!--QuoteBegin-rajesh_g+Oct 12 2006, 03:59 PM-->QUOTE(rajesh_g @ Oct 12 2006, 03:59 PM)<!--QuoteEBegin-->Can somebody please explain in laymans terms what these papers mean ?

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/jour...2812/42812.html
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0507714103v1

I found these papers mentioned here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetics_and_...s_of_South_Asia
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Why dont they have genetics and archeogenetics of China/eastasia
or the africa or the Europe also?

This entire project is being funded by the same people who where running
the East India company and who colonized India for 200 years.


The objective is neo colonization and colonization in the 21 century
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